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The Next Ragged University Events...

9th October Edinburgh Ragged University: Come along to the Counting House at 7pm to hear ‘Slow Leadership; Reframing Your Leadership Behaviour' by Don Ledingham - plus - ‘Welcome to the Mid-life Revolution' by Andy Ferguson....

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16th October Manchester Ragged University: Come along to the Castle Hotel at 7pm to listen to Simon Ward talk about '‘The Ragged Schools of Angel Meadow' - plus - 'Exploring the Dream of the Earth; my first person inquiry of discovery and understanding' by Helena Kettleborough....

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13th November Edinburgh Ragged University: Come along to the Counting House at 7pm to listen to ‘3D Printing: no-hype, promise, just extraordinary art and design!’ by Ann Marie Shillito - plus - 'Cerebral Diabetes and the Reversal of the Flynn Effect' by Mike McInnes....

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Philosophy for Everyone was suggested by Professor Duncan Pritchard

Philosophy for Everyone

As part of the Ragged Library, Professor Duncan Pritchard FRSE, of the University of Edinburgh’s School of Philosophy, Psychology & Language Sciences, suggested ‘Philosophy for Everyone by Matthew Chrisman, Duncan Pritchard, Jane Suilin Lavelle, Michela Massimi, Alasdair Richmond and Dave Ward (Routledge, 2013)’…

This book was a collaborative effort by a group of philosophy faculty from the University of Edinburgh. It arose out of a ‘MOOC’ (a Massive Open Online Course) that the Edinburgh Department of Philosophy began running in 2013 (entitled, ‘Introduction to Philosophy’). This course, which was entirely free and open to all, was designed to introduce people, whatever their background, to the basic issues of philosophy.

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Permaculture & Sustainability By Graham Bell

Have you ever read the Kama Sutra?  I have and I recommend it.  It is not as most people think a sex manual.  It is a guide to right livelihood (‘Dharma’).  Much as Shakespeare’s seven ages of man:

 

All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players.

They have their exits and their entrances,

And one man in his time plays many parts,

His acts being seven ages.

At first the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms.

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Beyond The Urban Fox by Bob Redwater

I sold all of my guns. The time had finally come for me to retire from an active life of hunting and poaching. It was my lack of mobility and fitness rather than a sudden attack of  guilty conscience that made up my mind. I need two sticks for walking and am no longer able to outrun a gamekeeper.

Most of my secret hunting activities took place on private estates owned by the gentry and run by their tweed clad servants. I was able to feed my family with a healthy diet of wild meat as apposed to battery reared animals and fowl which had lived a miserable life before they were slaughtered. My hunting methods were many and varied, perfected by trial and error over a lifetime. Rabbits were my mainstay but we also feasted on Hare, venison, pheasants, partridge, goose, duck, salmon and trout.

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Open Learn

Open University

Try over 600 free online courses from The Open University.  Available from introductory to advanced level, each takes between 1 and 50 hours to study.  Complete activities to assess your progress and compare your thoughts with sample answers.  Sign up for free to track your progress, connect with other learners in our discussion forums and find the tools to help you learn.

openlearn.open.ac.uk

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Stanford University Free Lectures

Stanford University

Think Stanford University is too expensive for you? Think again. Stanford offers a series of free online courses on topics ranging from Natural Language Processing to Anatomy.  Short length video lectures are recorded and recordings will be available, allowing students to watch the lectures at their leisure. Text transcriptions may be available for videos.

freevideolectures.com

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Education and Training the Workforce: A Digest by Alex Dunedin

The scope of this subject is large; its subject matter a source of potential ambiguity, however this is no good reason not to try and explore one of the multiple functions of education… The distinction between education and training in the United Kingdom is periodically, and of late more frequently, pronounced obsolete, yet it persists with an energy that suggests strong ideological and political value.  It seems to have relevance both for people of different persuasion about what education should be and for those with an interest in the way education and training resources are allocated.

As to the ‘workforce’ – there are certainly ambiguities.  We might focus on the relative participation rates of women and men, economy-wide and by sectors, and on the decline of primary and manufacturing sectors in favour of the service sectors and information technology.  But today the unemployed are an unavoidable factor in almost any calculation to do with education and training as an investment.
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Popular Culture and Music by Dan Zambas

The word ‘culture’ holds a variety of meanings within the English language. Depending on its context, the word can be applied to the arts, fashion, sociological studies and nationalism. This makes the interpretation of Popular Culture an abstract term that cannot be defined easily.

For the purposes of this supplement the context in which popular culture will be used will be in a sociological format. This is due to the nature of explaining how music fits into popular culture in a coherent manner and the effect of its place within society. Popular Music itself will be looked into during the next section of this supplement. Continue reading this article “Popular Culture and Music by Dan Zambas” »